FRANCISCAN FRIARS Office of Communications Province of St. John the Baptist

www.franciscan.org

November 17, 2017

Opening our eyes and hearts to poverty

By Fr.  Mark Soehner, OFM

PHOTO BY Shutterstock.comAs we gather to give thanks, consider those in need.Pope Francis wrote a letter on the Feast of St. Anthony this year that marks this coming Sunday, the 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time, as the First World Day of the Poor.  The purpose of this day, Nov. 19, is to develop “moments of encounter” with the poor, with actual moments of meeting people who are on the fringes of society.  I am attaching the Pope’s message to this News Notes e-mail.  It’s worth a read and then some thinking, either on one’s own or as a community about what we might actually do to make a difference.

In this message of Pope Francis, he continually refers to St. Francis as a model of change, transformation through his encounter with people on the peripheries.  When we speak about Revitalization and returning to the sources, for us friars it’s hard to imagine a more authentic source than the actual poor who are among us.  “If we truly wish to encounter Christ, we have to touch his body in the suffering bodies of the poor, as a response to the sacramental communion bestowed in the Eucharist” (paragraph 3).  I wonder if beyond simply studying our ancient documents, good as they are, we might engage in a new way of revitalization: to be taught by those in authentic poverty.

 For those in the United States, this is given to us immediately before Thanksgiving, a national holiday to give thanks, but also to consider those in need.  The Pope has a lot of ideas about how to go about this – including Prayer Services, Lectio Divina, etc.  But he has some pointed things for religious to consider as action steps:  “Every religious community, on this day, could take on an initiative such as: taking groceries to a needy   family, offering a meal for the poor, purchasing equipment for elderly persons who are not self-sufficient, donating a vehicle to a family, or making a contribution to the Caritas fund for families, etc.” (p. 84)  What about putting a coffee can on the Thanksgiving table and suggesting contributions to be given “to the poor Christ”?

Our action does not need to be confined to this one day.  In the next few weeks, let us know about any new encounter or experience that has happened recently with those on the edges.  As Franciscans, we are on the lookout for these “moments of encounter and friendship, solidarity and concrete assistance” with and for the poor.  In our tradition as Christians and Franciscans, we know this is one way for God to touch our lives as well.  It just might lead to a new revitalization.

Happy Thanksgiving and Happy World Day of the Poor!

‘Draw near to the Poor’

The Pope’s message for the First World Day of the Poor is posted at: vatican messages

Read the Minister General’s letter for the First World Day of the Poor at: ofm.org

Goodbye, Mr. Spalding

BY FR. MARK SOEHNER, OFM

Maybe a curveball led Luke Simon to God.(In his homily for the Nov. 8 funeral of Br. Luke Simon at St. Margaret Hall, Mark Soehner talked about this quiet friar’s journey as a metaphor for one of the loves of Luke’s life – baseball.)

In this age of Process Addictions a person could wonder whether Br. Luke had a “Baseball Addiction”.   Since this has never been my problem I just saw a glimpse during this past year’s World Series of the passion, the grit, the calculation of pitcher and batter. I can better understand why Br. Luke waited until after the ninth inning of the last game as a time to go home to the Lord.

I’d like to consider Luke’s life with the baseball metaphor, how he moved around the bases of his life.  Life comes at us as a fastball or a curveball, or low and outside.  Luke was lucky in his early life to have a loving grandmother, right near Wrigley Field in Chicago, Irene McGowan.  Luke called her “an Irish girl from a family of seven”.  Maybe both she and his Mom had those Irish eyes that could shine.  He and his cousin would pick up the trash around the stadium in exchange for a free ballgame.  Pretty good gig if you can get it.  And Luke got it – and his faith, his manners and many other good things – from his family, hitting a single and landing on first base.

A deeper search

PHOTO BY TONI CASHNELLITop, friar Luke in 1988; above, Luke arriving for Mass at St. Margaret Hall.Luke was drafted at the end of the Second World War and became part of the occupation of Germany.  Maybe it felt to him like a curveball, something unexpected.  There’s not much written about this time in his life, but as for many young people, a curveball can lead a person to God. So while I don’t know what happened during this time, it started some deeper search.  When young Corporal Donald returned from the Army, he did what a lot of young men did with the GI Bill – went to college at Marquette, then DePaul.

He had a number of jobs, ending up in Detroit as an Insurance Adjuster.  It suited him, but there was a deeper hunger, a searching that led him to Duns Scotus College.  He wrote to our Provincial, Vince Kroger, exactly 61 years from the day that he died, on Nov. 4, 1956.  He said:  “St. Francis begged for cement and bricks to repair God’s church, and following the advice from the cover wording on the pamphlet about Franciscan Brotherhood, I’m out begging, too.  With your assistance, I’ll realize my sincere desire to become a Franciscan Brother.”  He had a good wind up – and what a pitch!  Who could pass up such a sincere request?  In less than four months this search for God led him to the Franciscan Brothers School at Mt. Airy. He became Br. Luke, and landed on second base.

Now sometimes on second base, you stay for a while.   Other people are up to bat and somewhat control your ability to move.  After his solemn profession, Br. Luke did move around.  A quiet friar with many unusual talents, he had a flair for bowling and was sought after to be on one of the friar teams, which generally won, with Luke’s high score.  He was a practical jokester, a Fall Artist who could fall and look like he was hurt.  His gift of numbers helped him to be treasurer at Bishop Luers and Roger Bacon High Schools.  He served as porter, on pastoral teams and as local minister to St. Joseph Friary in Louisville.  During these 38 years in active ministry, where did his staying power come from?  From “knowing Christ and the power flowing from his resurrection.”  By sharing in Christ’s sufferings in Luke’s daily life, he hoped “to arrive at resurrection from the dead.” In 2002, he wanted a kind of semi- retirement at the then-St. Michael’s in Southfield.  He finally made it past the shortstop and slid into third.  He was semi-retired.  Third base.

Somewhat retired

Top, Luke celebrated his 50th Jubilee at a party at St. Michael’s; above, Luke with Joe Hund in Southfield, Mich.But for a semi-retired guy he was still working it.  Br. Luke became the assistant to Br. Michael Schebeci in the very active Poverty Program that had transferred there from Duns Scotus College when it closed.  There Br. Vince Delorenzo recalls that Luke and Mike would go out after a very strenuous day and putt golf balls onto an imaginary green of the backyard.  No doubt with a bit of small talk and teasing.  Br. Luke was there for 11 good years of semi-retirement that may have been closer to a full-time job at the Poverty Program.  As his body began to diminish, he was transferred back to St. Clement Friary.  And as his mobility lessened, he moved to St. Margaret Hall.  Here, surrounded by the care of the Sisters and many others, he was able to enjoy as much TV sports as possible, still favoring his baseball games.  It seemed to me in visiting him that they were kind of holy hours.  Nothing could interfere. When I was able to cajole him to come down and join the friars for our annual picnic, organized by Br. Jerry Beetz, he was his old Luke-self, laughing and teasing others.

A number of weeks ago Br. Norbert Bertram told me that while chatting with Luke, Luke looked up at the crucifix and said that he hoped He would take him soon.  Sounded like another wind-up and pitch, if you ask me.  Recently in a visit he told me, “I’m ready to go”.  I think he was off the base, trying to steal home.  With rosary in hand:  “I give no thought to what lies behind but push on to what is ahead.  My entire attention is on the finish line as I run toward the prize to which God calls me – life on high in Christ Jesus.”  Clearly, this was Luke’s energy.

Yes, he had a baseball addiction, but one that helped him on the road to his life with God.  Waiting until after this year’s World Series, Luke stole home right into the Arms of the Great Umpire who called him in Safe!  Oh, Luke was prepared, literally dying to join his Divine Thief, who loves to steal bases and hearts.  But this Thief is also, strangely, the Master of the House.  He gathered this servant at home base and proceeded to have him, Luke, the servant, recline at table, while he served up Hot dogs and cold beer here!

Luke, we, your brothers, will miss your wit, your charm, your funny way of getting us to do things you enjoyed.  But we’re glad you made it home.

‘A life bent on holiness’

The death of Br. Luke Simon was simple and powerful for me.  No question that he was ready and wanted to “go home”.  Yet, as I read in his file his initial request to be a Franciscan Brother, I was touched by his passion for this way of life, seen in the friars whom he had met at Duns Scotus in Detroit. To see this was both beautiful and sad – touching to me.

At the funeral, it was powerful to see St. Margaret Hall filled with friars who came to honor their brother and friend.  Some learned of his service in the Army at the tail end of World War II.  Others remembered his penchant for practical jokes.  Everyone remembered Luke’s baseball addiction.  But I was also privileged to see a life bent on holiness:  connection to God, the brothers, and to the poor.

–Fr. Mark Soehner, OFM

Vocations: We’re all in this together

BY FR. RICHARD GOODIN, OFM

Deputized as a vocation director, Clifford Hennings, right,  joined Richard Goodin Nov. 10 to talk about about how to #becomeafriar at #McNicholas High School in Cincinnati.North, south, east and west, I’ve been there doing vocation work. OK, at least all those directions east of the Mississippi River. It was decided when we began working in the office that Fr. Page Polk would take the West and I the East; the Mississippi River as the divide. It provides us a focus and a clear line of demarcation as we undertake the work of “pastoral care of vocations”, as the Order calls it.

And not only has my work been from Michigan to south Florida, from Virginia to Kansas (that is west of the river, I know, but I had good reason to be there), but my work has been more than MY work. In Michigan I’m deputizing Fr. Alex Kratz  to do an initial interview with a young man who is inquiring about our way of life. Fr. Colin King was with me in south Florida, in the Diocese of Venice to be exact, to tag team the diocese’s 3,000+ attendee youth conference (the Apostolic Nuncio was the keynote and a back row gawker with us friars during the musical concerts aimed at the young attendees). Fr. Bob Bruno sent me an inquirer he has known in Virginia whom I followed up on. And yes, my adventure to Kansas was for the NRVC orientation previously mentioned in this publication. And I cannot forget to mention that Fr. Clifford Hennings has introduced me to two men from the University of Cincinnati, so there’s been a touch of local work, too.

Brothers, vocations are out there. God is calling men to religious life. So, I’m making it my business to be highly visible with business cards at the ready. I wear my habit everywhere. I’m a walking billboard for the friar minor way of life. In every airport and restaurant during my travels I’m a real-life happy friar. I roped another friar into being at the youth rally to witness to our life of fraternity. I’m enlisting Bob and Alex to be of support to the vocation office. And that too is a witness to fraternity: We don’t recruit in a lone ranger fashion but we build a web of fraternity around those who are discerning.

I have worked with many men interested in our way of life; via e-mail, text, social media and even the rare phone call. They are asking if we are “authentic friars.” They want to know about how the merger will affect their formation should they apply. But they aren’t the only ones curious. I’ve been doing school Masses and talks in classrooms around Cincinnati: They want to know where we’ve been hiding if we have been here for 150+ years. They like what I’ve told them about us. And they told me: You guys need to do a better job advertising yourselves because we didn’t realize you were here in the city!

Brothers, we don’t have a vocations problem. We have an awareness problem. We are being found on the Internet and not in our beloved city of Cincinnati or in the churches we pastor or the ministries we do. So please, take a cue from Bob and Clifford and invite men to become a friar! Or to say it in the language young men will understand: #becomeafriar. As you do that, I promise to cover the bases to the north, south, east and west (all east of the Mississippi River, that is).

(Check out the province’s eight videos for Vocation Awareness Week at: youtube.com)

Allergy or infection? It’s confusing!

The symptoms of sinus infection and allergies can be similar.  Both can cause symptoms such as runny nose, congestion, headaches, nighttime cough, and difficulty breathing.  You are more likely to have a sinus infection if you have fever, colored nasal discharge, and facial or sinus pain.  Sinus infection often presents itself if a person constantly suffers from nasal congestion caused by some medical condition such as a cold.

Symptoms of sinus infection and when to see the doctor:

  • SORE THROAT AND HOARSE VOICE where postnasal drip can leave you with a raw and aching throat
  • THROAT IRRITATION AND COUGH which can be worse when lying down to sleep or first thing in the morning after getting up from bed as the discharge from your sinuses drains down, especially over a long period of time
  • SINUS HEADACHES caused by pressure and swelling in your sinuses. It is usually worse in the morning from collecting all night long. Sinus pain can also give you earaches, dental pain, and pain in your jaws and cheeks.
  • NASAL CONGESTION or swelling in your sinuses and nasal passages restricts how well you can breathe through your nose.  You probably won’t be able to smell or taste as well as normal.
  • NASAL DISCHARGE which can be cloudy green or yellow.  This discharge comes from your infected sinuses and drains into your nasal passages.
  • PAIN IN YOUR SINUSES is a common symptom of sinusitis.  You have several different sinuses above and below your eyes as well as behind your nose.  Any of these can hurt when you have a sinus infection.

Acute sinusitis only lasts for a short time, less than four weeks.  It is usually part of a cold or other respiratory illness. Chronic sinus infections last more than 12 weeks or continue to recur.  The main criteria for sinusitis include facial pain, infected nasal discharge, and congestion.  Many sinus infection symptoms are common to both acute and chronic forms.  Seeing your doctor is the best way to learn if you have an infection, to find the cause, and to get treatment. Make an appointment with your doctor if you have a fever, nasal discharge, congestion, or facial pain that lasts longer than 10 days or keeps coming back.

If you can’t treat your cold at home, seeing a primary care doctor is your best bet.  Using a nasal decongestant spray such as oxymetazoline can help relieve sinus infection symptoms short-term but limit your use to no more than three days to prevent a rebound effect in nasal congestion.

Other nasal sprays include fluticasone or triamcinolone without the risk of rebound symptoms from prolonged use.  Some medications over the counter that contain antihistamines and decongestants can help with sinus infections, particularly if you also suffer from allergies, are:

  • Sudafed
  • Zyrtec
  • Allegra
  • Claritin

Decongestants are typically not recommended for people with high blood pressure, prostate issues, glaucoma, or sleep difficulties.  Talk to your doctor before taking any of these medicines to make sure that they are the best choice for your specific medical condition.

Wash your hands frequently, especially during cold and flu season to keep your sinuses from becoming irritated or infected.  Breathe well!

–Michelle Viacava, RN

Province Nurse

  • PHOTOS BY CARL LANGENDERFER, OFMTop, the fire at its height; Carl went back the next morning to see what was left.It could hardly have been closer – a mere half-block from Holy Family Church in Oldenburg, Ind. But because an alert passerby noticed the flames, a fire that gutted a storage barn on Pearl Street was confined to that building. Wednesday about 9 p.m., Pastor Carl Langenderfer heard the commotion and grabbed his camera phone to take these photos as a half-dozen fire trucks from Batesville and Oldenburg converged on the scene. No one was hurt, but everything inside, including a car and contractor’s lumber, was destroyed. “Luckily, the Creche Shop full of handmade creches next door was not damaged,” Carl says. “The winds blew the fire the other direction.”
  • Photos of friars Cyprian Berens and Hilarion Kistner will appear on billboards throughout the Archdiocese of Cincinnati to preview the Retirement Fund for Religious collection Dec. 9 and 10. This year 390 religious communities across the country received funds for eldercare expenses from the 2016 campaign.
  • Nov. 4, Fr. John Aherne was one of more than 100 friars from the three branches of the Franciscan first order who “converged in a spirit of fraternity and joy” at Catholic PHOTO BY CASEY COLE, OFMFriars converged “in a spirit of fraternity and joy”.Theological Union to attend “Looking to the Future Together: Beyond Ite Voce.” According to John, “This Franciscan Study Day was convened at the behest of the ESC after Pope Francis urged friars to work together for an ‘authentic and profound reconciliation’ of the three branches of the first order in the hopes that such unity would renew the power of the spirit of Francis and Clare in the modern world.” Read his report on the gathering at: usfranciscans.org
  • Save the date: The dedication of the new St. Anthony Center, a hub of outreach services for our neighbors in Over-the-Rhine, is at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 12. An open house for the public follows from 5-7 p.m. Those partnering with the Franciscan Friars are: The Center for Respite Care; Franciscan Ministries’ Haircuts from the Heart; Mary Magdalen House; Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/Welcome Home Collaborative; St. Francis Seraph Ministries; Sweet Cheeks Diaper Bank; and TriHealth Outreach Ministries.
  • https://www.facebook.com/RogerBaconHS/Veterans were recognized at an assembly at Roger Bacon.The Roger Bacon community calls this “our favorite assembly”. Nov. 9, students and staff welcomed more than 75 American heroes to its annual Veterans Day Breakfast at the school in St. Bernard. “Thank you to all men and women who have served or continue to serve our country,” RB says on Facebook. “The Spartan Army is forever grateful for your sacrifice!”
  • St. Bonaventure University has merged the Department of Theology and School of Franciscan Studies. The move is designed “to strengthen both academics and mission,” according to the school. “The university’s Faculty Senate officially dissolved the School of Franciscan Studies to pave the way for the consolidation. The new department, to be called Theology and Franciscan Studies, will be housed under the School of Arts and Sciences. The administrative reorganization will allow the Institute to focus its attention on scholarly research and publishing, said Fr. David Couturier, OFM Cap, executive director of the Institute.”
  • A Franciscan Christmas returns to Christian Moerlein Brewery, 1621 Moore St. in Over-the-Rhine, from Nov. 24 to Jan. 1.  The expansive display orchestrated by Br. Tim Sucher features nativity scenes from around the world, a Dickens Village, trains, a Santa Claus collection and an array of Christmas trees. Hours are 4-10 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 4 p.m.-midnight Fridays, noon-midnight Saturdays and 1-7 p.m. Sundays. Admission is free; donations are welcome for the support of St. Francis Seraph Church and School. Free parking is available on the street, in the small lot across from the side entrance and in two lots south of the building on Moore Street. The live nativity nearby in the courtyard of St. Francis Seraph Church at Liberty and Vine is open 1-7 p.m. daily starting Nov. 24.

Congratulations, novices!

Left to right: Antonio Luevano (SB); James LaGrutta (HNP); Jason Damon (HNP); Michael Lomas (SB); Troy Hillman (HNP); and Luis M. Rosado (HNP)Nov. 14, the six novices in the OFM Interprovincial Novitiate received their habits in a service attended by friars from across the country at Old Mission Santa Barbara in California. The 45-minute ceremony was livestreamed from the friars’ chapel. The prayer service took on a distinctly interobediential flavor, with the presence of confreres from the nearby Conventual and Capuchin Franciscan novitiate programs.  The six novices, all of whom represent Holy Name or St. Barbara provinces, are:  Jason Damon (HNP), 23, from Buffalo, N.Y.; Luis M. Rosado (HNP), 46, from Puerto Rico; Troy Hillman  (HNP), 24, of Olean, N.Y.;  James LaGrutta (HNP), 28, of  Goshen, N.Y.; Michael Lomas (SB), 29, from San Jose, Calif.; and, Antonio Luevano (SB), 28, of San Bernardino, Calif. Thanks to Fr. Charles Talley of St. Barbara Province for his reporting.

Celebration would wake the dead

BY FR. FRANK JASPER, OFM

PHOTOS BY FRANK JASPER, OFMIt was a family affair with activities for all.Altars in the trunks of cars commemorated the beloved deceased.  This shrine for a loved one displayed a lot of creativity.The grounds of the mission were awash with color.Even dogs had their day at this celebration.1 - 6<>When the friars told me that Dia de Muertos was a big celebration, I thought they were exaggerating until I saw the delivery of 30-40 Port-O-Lets. Then I realized that this was going to be BIG!

I’d estimate more than 30,000 people came to Mission San Luis Rey in San Diego County for “The Day of the Dead” on Oct. 29. Cars were parked all over the 59-acre mission complex. It was a family affair with no admission and plenty of activities for all. The crowd was mostly Hispanic, but it was very inclusive with a wide diversity that you rarely see in the Midwest. In the early afternoon, the crowd along the main aisle was so tight, you could barely move.

I found the most fascinating and unusual part was the auto show. Beautiful classic cars, polished to perfection, were lined up along the entrance drive. Each had their trunks open with an altar in the trunk commemorating their beloved deceased. That was the unusual part – an altar in the trunk. Parishioners also had the usual large altars set up around the parish church that were more expansive and elaborate. The parish sponsored a “Chalk Cemetery,” where they divided the blacktop cemetery road into grids and families could decorate a block with colored chalk to remember their beloved dead. People decorated several hundred blocks with elaborate designs specific for their relatives.

Kids were running all over the place, playing on the inflatable toys, watching the dancers, listening to the live music, getting their faces painted, enjoying special sweet treats and just having a great time. Some had great costumes and enjoyed having people take their pictures. Others polished their bicycles and had them on display, imitating the adults with their cars. Of course, I took plenty of pictures of it all.

Vendors of every kind jammed in front of the mission church. The friars had a booth at which they commemorated the 12 friars who died during the past year, and they talked to young people about vocations. They didn’t throw a habit on any of them, but they did make several initial contacts. Other friars watched the action from the security of the friary balcony.

On Nov. 2, the Feast of All Souls, Pastor Vincent Mesi and Francisco Alejo celebrated a bilingual evening Mass for the deceased. Eight hundred to a thousand people packed the main church. Following the celebration Frs. Vince and Francisco led a procession to the cemetery where people placed candles on the graves of their loved ones, and many of the friars joined them in praying for their deceased and blessing the graves. It was a real testimony to their faith in the resurrection and a beautiful ceremony on this warm evening with a full moon.

(Mission San Luis Rey was the most recent stop in Frank’s sabbatical.)

 

Send comments or questions to: sjbfco@franciscan.org

ARCHIVES

FRANCISCAN FRIARS Office of Communications Province of St. John the Baptist

PHOTO BY Shutterstock.comAs we gather to give thanks, consider those in need.Pope Francis wrote a letter on the Feast of St. Anthony this year that marks this coming Sunday, the 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time, as the First World Day of the Poor.  The purpose of this day, Nov. 19, is to develop “moments of encounter” with the poor, with actual moments of meeting people who are on the fringes of society.  I am attaching the Pope’s message to this News Notes e-mail.  It’s worth a read and then some thinking, either on one’s own or as a community about what we might actually do to make a difference.

 For those in the United States, this is given to us immediately before Thanksgiving, a national holiday to give thanks, but also to consider those in need.  The Pope has a lot of ideas about how to go about this – including Prayer Services, Lectio Divina, etc.  But he has some pointed things for religious to consider as action steps:  “Every religious community, on this day, could take on an initiative such as: taking groceries to a needy   family, offering a meal for the poor, purchasing equipment for elderly persons who are not self-sufficient, donating a vehicle to a family, or making a contribution to the Caritas fund for families, etc.” (p. 84)  What about putting a coffee can on the Thanksgiving table and suggesting contributions to be given “to the poor Christ”?

Top, Luke celebrated his 50th Jubilee at a party at St. Michael’s; above, Luke with Joe Hund in Southfield, Mich.But for a semi-retired guy he was still working it.  Br. Luke became the assistant to Br. Michael Schebeci in the very active Poverty Program that had transferred there from Duns Scotus College when it closed.  There Br. Vince Delorenzo recalls that Luke and Mike would go out after a very strenuous day and putt golf balls onto an imaginary green of the backyard.  No doubt with a bit of small talk and teasing.  Br. Luke was there for 11 good years of semi-retirement that may have been closer to a full-time job at the Poverty Program.  As his body began to diminish, he was transferred back to St. Clement Friary.  And as his mobility lessened, he moved to St. Margaret Hall.  Here, surrounded by the care of the Sisters and many others, he was able to enjoy as much TV sports as possible, still favoring his baseball games.  It seemed to me in visiting him that they were kind of holy hours.  Nothing could interfere. When I was able to cajole him to come down and join the friars for our annual picnic, organized by Br. Jerry Beetz, he was his old Luke-self, laughing and teasing others.

Deputized as a vocation director, Clifford Hennings, right,  joined Richard Goodin Nov. 10 to talk about about how to #becomeafriar at #McNicholas High School in Cincinnati.North, south, east and west, I’ve been there doing vocation work. OK, at least all those directions east of the Mississippi River. It was decided when we began working in the office that Fr. Page Polk would take the West and I the East; the Mississippi River as the divide. It provides us a focus and a clear line of demarcation as we undertake the work of “pastoral care of vocations”, as the Order calls it.

The symptoms of sinus infection and allergies can be similar.  Both can cause symptoms such as runny nose, congestion, headaches, nighttime cough, and difficulty breathing.  You are more likely to have a sinus infection if you have fever, colored nasal discharge, and facial or sinus pain.  Sinus infection often presents itself if a person constantly suffers from nasal congestion caused by some medical condition such as a cold.

FRANCISCAN FRIARS
Office of Communications Province of St. John the Baptist

Top, Luke celebrated his 50th Jubilee at a party at St. Michael’s; above, Luke with Joe Hund in Southfield, Mich.But for a semi-retired guy he was still working it.  Br. Luke became the assistant to Br. Michael Schebeci in the very active Poverty Program that had transferred there from Duns Scotus College when it closed.  There Br. Vince Delorenzo recalls that Luke and Mike would go out after a very strenuous day and putt golf balls onto an imaginary green of the backyard.  No doubt with a bit of small talk and teasing.  Br. Luke was there for 11 good years of semi-retirement that may have been closer to a full-time job at the Poverty Program.  As his body began to diminish, he was transferred back to St. Clement Friary.  And as his mobility lessened, he moved to St. Margaret Hall.  Here, surrounded by the care of the Sisters and many others, he was able to enjoy as much TV sports as possible, still favoring his baseball games.  It seemed to me in visiting him that they were kind of holy hours.  Nothing could interfere. When I was able to cajole him to come down and join the friars for our annual picnic, organized by Br. Jerry Beetz, he was his old Luke-self, laughing and teasing others.

Deputized as a vocation director, Clifford Hennings, right,  joined Richard Goodin Nov. 10 to talk about about how to #becomeafriar at #McNicholas High School in Cincinnati.North, south, east and west, I’ve been there doing vocation work. OK, at least all those directions east of the Mississippi River. It was decided when we began working in the office that Fr. Page Polk would take the West and I the East; the Mississippi River as the divide. It provides us a focus and a clear line of demarcation as we undertake the work of “pastoral care of vocations”, as the Order calls it.